Monday, September 22, 1997

Editor’s note: This article was initially published in The Daily Gazette, Swarthmore’s online, daily newspaper founded in Fall 1996. As of Fall 2018, the DG has merged with The Phoenix. See the about page to read more about the DG.

The Daily Gazette

Swarthmore College
Monday, September 22, 1997
Volume 2, Number 16

NEWS IN BRIEF

1)  Morning shuttle might not be expensive, SC member reports

2)  T-shirt slogan true: Swarthmore grades tougher, study finds

3)  Phoenix editors-in-chief fire Living and Arts editor

4)  World news roundup

SPORTS IN BRIEF

1)  The weekend’s results

2)  Field hockey still undefeated

3)  Cross-country finishes strong at home meet

4)  Two soccer players voted all-tournament at Seven Sisters

5)  Women’s rugby shuts out Lehigh

6)  Today’s and tomorrow’s contests

WEATHER FORECAST

Today:    Sunny and bright, breezy. High of 70.
           It’s still shorts weather — take advantage of it.
Tonight:  Clouds rolling in, very small chance of rain. Low around 55.
           Brrr. Get out of those shorts. Wait, that came out wrong….
Tuesday:  Partly cloudy, chance of showers. High near 75.

CORRECTION

A headline on an article about Student Council in Thursday’s edition of The
Daily Gazette did not accurately characterize the opinions of most Council
members. It implied that many SC members feel there is “B.S.” on Council
when, as the article itself noted, only one member said he felt that way.

NEWS REPORT

1)  Morning shuttle might not be expensive, SC member reports

Student Council member Jeanne Gallego ’00 last night told SC that she had
talked to Budget Committee Treasurer Vincent Jones ’98 about the estimated
cost of running a shuttle to off-campus dorms a few times each weekday
morning and that “the figure was not a big one.” Gallego will meet with
Jones today to further discuss costs, which would be covered by BC, and
will put together a proposal by next week.

Council members also expressed concern about the number of students who
were not granted campus parking spaces. Several members said these students
could park in the Ville at a cost of $10 a month. Other members said that
many people applying for campus spaces may not really need them, and that
one way to prevent such people from applying would be to charge a monthly
fee for on-campus parking.

SC decided to discuss the issue with the administration and to poll the
student body.

*****

2)  T-shirt slogan true: Swarthmore grades tougher, study finds

Anywhere but Swarthmore it might have been an A, one law school has decided.

When admissions officials at Boalt Hall, the law school at the University
of California-Berkeley, compared applicants’ grades to scores on the Law
School Admission Test, they found Swarthmore’s grading was more stringent
than that of any other college or university, according to a July report in
the Los Angeles Times.

The results of the ranking are used to adjust applicants’ grade point
averages. Those from high-ranking schools, such as Swarthmore, have points
added to their GPAs, while those from low-ranking schools have points taken
off.

Swarthmore scored 89.5 on Boalt Hall’s scale. Williams College was second
with 89.0, and Duke University came in third with 88.5. Farther down the
list, Haverford College scored 85.0, and Bryn Mawr scored 83.0. Any
institution scoring 79 or higher was considered to have tougher-than-usual
grades.

Civil rights groups have challenged the ranking system, arguing that it
unfairly disadvantages applicants from institutions whose students are
predominantly people of color.

*****

3)  Phoenix editors-in-chief fire Living and Arts editor

Josh Kramer ’00, co-editor of the Living and Arts section of The Swarthmore
Phoenix, was fired Friday afternoon by the weekly newspaper’s
editors-in-chief, George Balgobin ’00 and Arun Mohan ’00. Kramer, Balgobin
and Mohan all said communication problems made the action necessary.

According to Balgobin, there had been several contentious incidents in
recent weeks. Principles of editing were one source of disagreement.
Balgobin believed that, while editing an article, Kramer would insert words
without informing the author, making revisions “such that the scope of the
article was changed.”

Balgobin said, however, that this was not the reason Kramer was fired. The
editors-in-chief were willing to discuss situations in which their tactics
and principles varied from those of Kramer, but when they tried to work out
policies, the conversation would degenerate into vociferous arguments, he
said.

Kramer said Mohan and Balgobin “did exactly what they should have done
(given the disagreement)….It’s their paper.”

Patrick Runkle ’98, formerly Kramer’s co-editor and now sole editor of the
Living and Arts section, said he did not believe Kramer’s position needed
to be filled right away, though he may look for an assistant in the near
future. Runkle was present when Kramer was fired, but he did not play an
active part in the decision. Balgobin said, “It was purely Arun’s and my
call.”

Kramer said he was not sure whether he would continue to write for the
newspaper.

*****

4)  World news roundup

RENO TAKES FIRST STEP TOWARD NAMING SPECIAL PROSECUTOR

Attorney General Janet Reno late last week opened a preliminary inquiry
into the need for an independent counsel to investigate President Clinton’s
1996 fund-raising activities. If the 30-day review finds evidence that
Clinton violated an 1883 law banning campaign fund raising on federal
property, the Justice Department will begin a second, longer investigation.
Reno could then ask a special panel of three judges to appoint an
independent prosecutor. Vice President Al Gore is already facing a similar
preliminary inquiry. Clinton and Gore have denied any wrongdoing.

SOLIDARITY REGAINS POWER IN POLAND

Solidarity, the group of parties descended from the trade union that ousted
Poland’s communist government in 1989, defeated the ruling former
communists in legislative elections Sunday, according to results from exit
polls. Dissatisfaction with hardships sparked by Solidarity’s market
reforms prompted voters to take away Solidarity’s parliamentary majority in
1993. Solidarity did not have an outright majority in Sunday’s elections,
but with an estimated 34% of the vote it will have the first chance to form
a governing coalition.

IN OTHER NEWS …

Rebels who seceded from the Federal Islamic Republic of the Comoros said
Sunday they want an international force to protect them from government
attacks. … The Air Force is suspending all training flights today as it
investigates a string of six crashes in seven days. … President Clinton
on Sunday threatened to veto the annual education spending bill if it
doesn’t include a national testing program. … Fifty doctors and health
advocates have volunteered to risk their lives for AIDS research by
becoming the first humans to be injected with a live HIV vaccine.

*****

SPORTS UPDATE

1)  The weekend’s results

MEN’S RUGBY
Men’s rugby lost to Millersville 39-0 at home on Saturday.

FOOTBALL
Football traveled to Johns Hopkins on Friday and lost 73-0.

MEN’S ULTIMATE
At a tournament Saturday at Rutgers, the A team lost 12-7 to Tufts, 13-7 to
Rutgers and 13-8 to Princeton, but beat Lafayette 13-4. The B team lost
11-8 to Drew and Princeton’s B team, beat Rutgers 11-8 and lost 11-5 to
Penn State’s B team.

WOMEN’S ULTIMATE
The team defeated Haverford and Penn State but lost to the University of
Pennsylvania, Princeton and Rutgers in a tournament Saturday.

MEN’S TENNIS
Members of the men’s tennis team played other individuals from Yale,
University of Pennsylvania, Boston University, Providence, University of
Connecticut, Kenyon College and Georgetown University this weekend. “We got
beat pretty bad,” said team member John Temin ’00. But in a surprise
victory, Temin and John Leary ’00 won the B-flight doubles. Leary also won
a match in the B-flight singles draw.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL
Women’s volleyball was defeated by teams from Gettysburg and Bryn Mawr at
Gettysburg on Saturday. Swarthmore was forced to forfeit its first game
against Gettysburg for arriving late. Playing with no time to warm up,
Swarthmore lost 15-2 in both the second and the third games. The Bryn Mawr
game started out with a 15-10 win for Swarthmore, but Bryn Mawr won the
next three games 15-12, 17-15, 16-14.

*****

2)  Field hockey still undefeated

The field hockey team extended its winning streak Saturday with a 5-2 win
against Gettysburg. Lurah Hess ’99 scored two goals and had one assist,
while Danielle Duffy ’98 and Holly Baker ’99 each had one goal and one
assist and Julie Finnegan ’00 scored one goal. The Garnet’s record is now
6-0 for the season and 3-0 in the Centennial Conference.

*****

3)  Cross-country finishes strong at home meet

The women’s cross-country team beat Johns Hopkins, Catholic, and alumnae
from Swarthmore at home Saturday. Swarthmore’s top runners were Joko
Agunloye ’01 in second place and Danielle Wall ’98 in fifth place. Ingrid
Spies, a 1996 Swarthmore graduate and current assistant coach, finished
first.

The men’s cross-country team beat out Swarthmore alumni and Catholic
University to finish second, behind Johns Hopkins, in Saturday’s meet. Phil
Jones ’99 won the race.

*****

4)  Two soccer players voted all-tournament at Seven Sisters

At the Seven Sisters Tournament, held this year at Vassar, the Garnet beat
St. Joseph’s, the invited team, on Saturday 2-0, and lost to Mount Holyoke
on Sunday 0-3. Betsy Rosenbaum ’98 scored both of Swarthmore’s points.
Coaches named Rosenbaum and Sarah Jaquette ’98 to the all-tournament team.

*****

5)  Women’s rugby shuts out Lehigh

The women’s rugby team defeated Lehigh University on Saturday 25-0 with 4
tries, one 2-point conversion and one field goal off a penalty. The tries
were scored by Sarah Cross ’99, Courtney Clark ’98, Lynn Matthews ’98 and
Bridget Arbour ’98. Beth Wiles ’98 scored the field goal and the 2-point
conversion.

*****

6)  Today’s and tomorrow’s contests

TODAY
Women’s tennis travels to Kutztown for a 4 p.m. game.

TOMORROW
Field hockey hosts Drew at 4 p.m. on Cunningham Field.

*****

Interested in reporting or writing for the Gazette? Just want to tell us
what you think? Contact the Board of Editors at
gazette-management@student-publications.swarthmore.edu.

Got a news tip for us?
E-mail gazette-news@student-publications.swarthmore.edu.

Want to contact our sports editors?
E-mail gazette-sports@student-publications.swarthmore.edu.

The Daily Gazette
Board of Editors
Fred Bush
Kate Doty
Aarti Iyer
Jennifer Klein
Karen Lloyd
Lorrin Nelson
Sam Schulhofer-Wohl

Weatherman
Rafi Dowty

Contributing Writer
Julie Falk

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This concludes today’s report.

Copyright 1997 by The Daily Gazette. All rights reserved.