Monday, January 27, 1997

Editor’s note: This article was initially published in The Daily Gazette, Swarthmore’s online, daily newspaper founded in Fall 1996. As of Fall 2018, the DG has merged with The Phoenix. See the about page to read more about the DG.

The Daily Gazette

Swarthmore College
Monday, January 27, 1997
Volume 1, Number 3

NEWS IN BRIEF

1) Eugene Lang delivers “A Dream for All of Us” speech at Collection

2) Sophomores eat chocolates, choose majors with deans

3) World Game Workshop comes to Tarble

4) Vincent Jones ’98 named new treasurer of student Budget Committee

SPORTS IN BRIEF

1) The weekend’s results

2) Men’s B-ball reaches 0.500

3) Up-and-coming Women’s Basketball edges out Western Maryland

4) Track tears up Widener Invite

5) Tonight’s and tomorrow’s contests

NEWS REPORT

1) Eugene Lang delivers “A Dream for All of Us” speech at Collection

At Friday’s Collection, Swarthmore benefactor and founder of the “I Have
a Dream” program Eugene Lang ’38 spoke on occasion of the birthday of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Lang detailed the development of his program,
which he named in honor of King and the 1963 “I Have a Dream” speech
which he praised for the “majesty of its simplicity.”

The “I Have a Dream” program began with a promise Lang made “on impulse”
while speaking to an East Harlem elementary school class in 1981: if
members of that class of sixth graders completed high school and chose to
go to college, he would pay their college tuition. Since then, Lang has
inspired sponsors in 160 communities all over the country and created a
network of 15,000 “dreamers.”

Lang’s primary message was both inspirational and simple: “Small
individual initiatives can sow seeds of significance.” This message
seemed to resonate in the personal stories of “dreamers” who changed
their circumstances and took charge of their futures through the program.
Lang encouraged the audience to commit to change and to keep hope alive;
the “I Have a Dream” foundation, he said, “affirms that there is a
solution to educational problems in America…and the solution is us.”

*****

2) Sophomores eat chocolates, choose majors with deans

On Thurday night, the Dean’s Office sponsored “Chocolates and Choosings,”
an annual forum designed to familiarize sophomores with the process of
applying for a major. Dean Bob Gross welcomed the students in a fashion
similar to his freshman greeting. Martin Warner spoke on the logistical
issues, such as forms and deadlines. Finally, Craig Williamson, English
professor and head of the Honors Program, pitched the Oxford tutorial
method to the sophomores. Also in attendance were members of most
departments and concentrations. Most noticably not represented were the
Biology and Physics departments. The evening was highlighted by a variety
of chocolate delicacies.

The messages sent by the faculty seemed mixed. One speaker would
encourage a double major, while others seemed to frown upon the idea.
Gross said, “It is not the bells and whistles we are concerned with.”
When asked if the Biology department was present, Gross replied jokingly,
“They have so many majors they don’t need to come!” After the speeches,
students mingled with the various representatives and received answers to
their departmental questions. Those who had already decided their majors
cited chocolate as their main reason for attending the program.

*****

3) World Game Workshop comes to Tarble

Two dozen students gathered on the second floor of Tarble Friday night to
save the world. Splayed in their stocking feet over a fifteen foot
topographic map of the world, they bartered units of food, energy, and
technology for several hours as part of the World Game Workshop.

Invented by Buckminster Fuller and run by the World Game Institute in
Philadelphia, the game is a simulation of the global economy, with
players representing everything from multi-national corporations to the
UN and the World Health Organization. Participants face global
distribution and population problems and try to craft global solutions.

The game was intended by its creator to “foster responsible change and
citizenship in a global society” by requiring players to direct the
economy with the future in mind. The coordinator from the World Game
Institute emphasized that “the inability to imagine a positive future is
in itself a threat to survival.” If that’s the case, Swatties beware:
when these students were asked about their visions of the future, their
predictions were dire indeed.

The workshop was part of a semester long leadership series on campus
being coordinated by Jen Lee and Anna Mar’a Cobo.

*****

4) Vincent Jones ’98 named new treasurer of student Budget Committee

Vincent Jones ’98 has been appointed treasurer of the student Budget
Committee, replacing Tanisha Little ’97.

Little served two years as BC treasurer and one year as assistant
treasurer. “She’s served three years and we appreciate and recognize
that,” said Sean Barney, co-chair of Student Council.

Jones’s appointment lasts until next winter.

SPORTS REPORT

1) The weekend’s results

SWIMMING
Both the men and women beat Dickinson to remain undefeated in the
Centennial Conference at 3-0.

WRESTLING
Swat 21, Johns Hopkins 19
* Jesse Bean ’00, 190 pounds, clinched the victory with a pin. Swat 24,
Muhlenberg 18
* Alec Stall ’98 had a pin in the 167 pounds weight class. Gettysburg 46,
Swat 0
* Adrian Wilson ’99 and Pete Balvanz ’98 each won twice. Swarthmore
wrestling is now 5-10 overall, 2-1 in the Centennial Conference

SUPER BOWL
Green Bay Packers 35, New England Patriots 21 Game MVP Desmond Howard
returned a kickoff (a Super Bowl-record 99 yards) with 3:10 left in the
third quarter for a touchdown, clinching the win for Green Bay.

*****

2) Men’s B-ball reaches .500

The Garnet soundly defeated their hosts, the Green Terror of Western
Maryland, Saturday afternoon by the score of 80-65. The win evens the
team’s overall record at 8-8 and their Centennial Conference record at
3-3. Tim Schofield ’98 scored a career-high 29 points on 10-14 shooting
including 5-8 three-pointers. Captain Ben Schall ’97 added 15 and A.J.
Shanley 12. The Garnet broke away in the second half, outscoring their
opponents 46-31.

*****

3) Up-and-coming Women’s Basketball edges out Western Maryland

With a career-high 16 points Jean Quinn ’99 led Swarthmore to a 60-59
victory over Western Maryland in women’s basketball. The Garnet led by as
much as 16 before the Green Terror, who were in second place in the West
Division with a 10-3 (5-2) record, mounted a comeback on the strength of
a 15-4 run. Holly Barton ’99 hit a key three-pointer with 1:00 left in
the game and tallied 13 points for the game. Lisl Cochran-Bond ’97 added
11. With the win, Swarthmore improves to 6-7 overall, 3-4 in the
conference.

*****

4) Track tears up Widener Invite

Time’s weren’t as fast as they might have been on a better track, but
both men’s and women’s track and field made a strong showing at
Saturday’s Widener Invitational. The winners:
* Frosh Liam O’Neill handily won the mile race in 4:28. * No one could
touch Amalia Jerison ’00 in the two mile race, as she lapped all
competitors but teammate Alison Schirmer ’97 to win in 12:05.
* Mason Tootel ’99 won the 60 yard high hurdles in 8.0, a sizable 0.2
seconds faster than the rest of the field.
* Eric Pakurar ’97 won the 880 yard dash in 2:04. * The men’s 4×440 yard
relay of Tootel, Tony Sturm ’99, Walid Gellad ’97, and Pakurar had a
tight race up until the last leg, but won in 3:36.
* The women’s 4×440 yard relay of Catherine Laine ’98, Stephanie Herring
’99, Jill Wildonger ’97, and Danielle Wall ’98 didn’t have as tough a
time of it, easily winning the race in 4:29.

*****

5) Tonight’s and tomorrow’s contests

TONIGHT
Men’s JV hoops take on Widener at 7 p.m. in Tarble Pavilion.

TUESDAY
Badminton hosts its season opener against Academy New Church at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s basketball travels to Mulhenberg, game at 7 p.m.

*****

The Daily Gazette
Board of Editors
Fred Bush
Kate Doty
Jennifer Klein
David Lischer
Eric Pakurar
Sam Schulhofer-Wohl
Sylvia Weedman
Contributing Writers
Chris DiLeo

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This concludes today’s report.