Highlights - Page 3

The Future of German Studies

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An apocryphal joke supposedly originating from Mark Twain goes something along the lines of: “I have known many a student who would rather decline two German beers than one German adjective.” Many students today would rather, or so it seems, decline to study German at all. German and many other modern languages have seen a declining trend in class enrollment, majors, and minors. A recent interview with Professor of German Studies Karolina Hicke in the modern languages and literatures department at Swarthmore shines some light on the subject and reveals the challenges that German studies faces and the potential ways

Cheaters Never Prosper: Mo Katir’s Two-Year Suspension From Athletics

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Moroccan-born Spanish middle-distance star Mohamed “Mo” Katir had a meteoric rise to running stardom in 2021, perhaps somewhat suspiciously. He began securing Diamond League victories and claiming national records consistently, and was beginning to forward himself as one of the greatest runners of the 21st century.  Just last year, in early February, Katir set the indoor European record for the 3000-meter race with a sub 7:30 mark. During the outdoor season, he earned a second-place finish in the 5000-meter race at the World Championships in Hungary, which was preceded by a European record Katir set in the same distance with

Professor and Commentator Peter Beinart Offers History, Advocacy on Israel-Gaza

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On Tuesday, Feb. 20, professor and commentator Peter Beinart visited Swarthmore for the first event in the “South Africa to Gaza: World History and the Politics of Accountability” series. The series is hosted by the Aydelotte Foundation, the President‘s Office, Swarthmore College Libraries, Arabic, Art History, Black Studies, Educational Studies, English Literature, History, the Intercultural Center, Islamic Studies, Philosophy, and Sociology & Anthropology as “a timely response to the International Court of Justice’s (ICJ) hearings on genocide in Gaza that invites prominent academics, artists, and writers to advance a scholarly understanding of issues related to human rights and social justice

Why You Should Know Coach Tara VanDerveer 

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Tara VanDerveer, the legendary Stanford women’s basketball coach, began coaching before digital cellular phones were invented, in the age of Walkmans and MTV. You may not know the name Tara VanDerveer, but you surely should.  Coach VanDerveer surpassed coach Mike Kryzewski of Duke University as college basketball’s all-time winningest coach on Jan. 31 after her 1,203rd victory against Oregon State.  To rewind, yes, you read that correctly. Tara VanDerveer has a 1,203-267 collegiate basketball career win-loss record, three national titles, and fourteen NCAA Final Four appearances, earning her a reputation as the best strategist to ever coach the women’s game

Sabbatical? More Like Shabbatical.

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One of the darkest moments of my life fell on a Wednesday morning sometime in October of 2023. I was meeting with one of my professors during office hours to ask a few questions about course material and the future direction of the class. In true lighthearted and genuine conversation, we began talking briefly about our personal lives. We laughed, smiled, and even nodded at each other’s words. However, one sentence he said caught me off guard. One word, in particular, struck me as foreign, otherworldly, and even, in this case, threatening.  “I’m going on sabbatical next semester, which I’m

NonParrishable: An Exclusive Interview with Parrish Hall

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The face of Swarthmore College is its oldest and best known building: the Pastor Parrish Hall, sitting grandly at the top of Magill Walk. In the early years of the school, he was home to everything from the dining hall to dormitories to chemistry labs. Today, he houses a handful of students, a low-ceilinged basement where the Office of Student Engagement coexists with ghosts (probably) and dirty laundry, and the occasional administratively controversial protest. He was gracious enough to give me a slice of his time this week, catching me up on how these first few weeks of classes have

Fences

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In a groundbreaking move which has left the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College and students amazed for the past year, Swarthmore’s once-lush campus has been transformed into a construction site of environmental progress. While some students may have enjoyed serene strolls amidst the meticulously labeled plants, cute squirrels, and sounds of nature, now they get to feel like they’re a part of something greater: the Zero by Thirty-Five plan! Gone are the days of plant biodiversity, instead one may enjoy the craftsmanship of barbed wire.  As a show of appreciation, here are some of my favorite fences:  1. The fence

I’m Running for President

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Of the United States of America, of course. There is a great deal of current consternation over whether Donald J. Trump is eligible to serve as President of the United States again. The Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution stipulates that individuals who have “engaged in insurrection or rebellion” shall not “hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any state.” Some have argued that Trump cannot hold office due to his involvement in various efforts to overturn the 2020 election results. The sheer variety of responses that this argument has engendered is interesting. Ballot access

Bringing Home to Campus: Students Celebrate The Lunar New Year

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From Feb. 10 to 12, students participated in Lunar New Year festivities hosted by the Swarthmore Chinese Society (SCS) and Swarthmore Taiwanese Association (STA) to welcome the incoming Year of the Dragon based on the Chinese Zodiac.  Lunar New Year is celebrated in many parts of the world. Different variations of the holiday exist across countries, including Korea’s Seollal, Vietnam’s Tết, and Malaysia’s Tahun Baru Cina. The Chinese Zodiac consists of twelve animals that rotate on a cycle. This year marks the dragon: symbolizing luck, authority, and prosperity.  At the annual Swarthmore Dumpling-Making Session and Chu Xi Dinner on Feb.

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The Phoenix