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Swarthmore academic quality is dropping

in Opinions/Staff Editorials by

Year after year, Swarthmore College ranks as one the top institutions in the country. This year, the college currently ranks as number ten on Forbes’ Top Colleges list. Although a top ten ranking is not new for the college, it is still concerning. The reality is that the college has not been performing better, but rather worse, in Forbes’ rankings over the past several years. We once ranked as high as three, but have since clearly fallen to the tenth spot.

The downward trend is a concern to some, but for many students at Swarthmore, there is nothing to worry about. Swarthmore is an academically challenging institution, and students get reminded of that nearly every day. For some reason, many students correlate rigor of academics with quality of academics, and thus have no reason to fear that Swarthmore may one day fall out of the top ten.

But could they be wrong? Has the quality of academics at Swarthmore declined over the past several years, and has this decline been reflected in our ranking? The reality is that sometimes, students, faculty, and administration turn the other way and ignore the flaws within the college that have begun to harm the academic experience of Swarthmore students, and instead hide behind the statement that, “Swat is one of the best colleges in the country.”

We at the Phoenix no longer believe that Swarthmore is a great school, and that hiding behind the truth of the past has tarnished the quality of academics at Swarthmore. The decline in quality can be seen not only inside the classroom, but in the curriculum and academic structure overall.

Swarthmore brags about having small classes, but in reality, classes at Swarthmore are not very small, especially in departments with high enrollment. Although the student to teacher ratio is eight to one, according to the Common Data Set (most data in this article is pulled from the CDS), the average class size at Swat is 16.1. Some would say that the size of the larger classes are compensated by smaller subsections. However, the subsections are not much smaller than the classes, averaging at 14.3.

Although 16.1 is surely a small number, especially in comparison to larger institutions, the college uses several techniques to effectively lower this number as a statistic without actually providing students with the benefit of smaller classes. It is easy to see this if we ask the question, “Do most students at Swarthmore take courses that are, on average, of smaller sizes.”

The answer is no. Most students at Swarthmore College take courses that are much greater than 20 people in size. According to the Common Data Set, the top five degrees at Swarthmore are Economics at 16.4 percent of students, Political Science at 12.8 percent, Biology at 12 percent, and Computer Science at 10.6 percent, and Mathematics at 8.1 percent. These five majors alone sum to 59.9 percent of all degrees given by Swarthmore. Since about six of every ten students will major in one of these five departments, Swarthmore’s academic quality heavily relies on the experience of the students within these departments.

Unfortunately, in the top five departments, many of them have class sizes that are above twenty students, effectively falling into the “medium size” range. Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, which are both courses required for the Economics major, are both about 100 students in size every semester. With the exception of honors courses, many upper-level Economics courses are much greater than 20 students in size. Cellular and Molecular Biology is easily over 100 students every semester, with labs usually greater than 20 students. Without including the incoming freshman class, 38 students are already registered for this class for next fall. Every Intro to Computer Science section is easily over 30 students. Many reports have been posted before regarding how the Computer Science department is severely understaffed at the college.

Even in departments that fall out of the top five, some of the most important courses are large. Organic Chemistry, one of the most difficult courses at the college, will currently feature a robust 58 students. The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict course is set to feature 61 students with no subsections to complement the course. General Physics with Biomedical Applications has already reached 53 students for the upcoming semester.  

“At least courses are getting smaller.” This statement is false. In Fall 2010, the average class size was 14.8 and rose to 15.7 in Fall 2015. Subsections are rising in size as well. In the Fall 2000 semester, subsections were 9.9 students on average. In Fall 2016, they were 14.3.

“So the courses might be a bit larger than we hoped, but at least everyone always gets their classes.” Wrong again. For this upcoming semester, 74 Computer Science students were lotteried out of courses. This included upperclassmen in the department lotteried from upper-level courses. Many courses at Swarthmore end up being small because the college lotteries out students and forces them to take other courses in departments with empty seats. Foundation Drawing has already reached its enrollment limit of ten each for both sections, needing to lottery students to do so. Real Analysis I, a Mathematics major requirement, is also a vital course that was also lotteried out several students.  

It is easy to see that 16.1 is a skewed number, and that the College, on average, cannot provide its students with easily accessible small courses.   

“The College is financially in a place to fix this.” One could argue this statement is false. For the last four years, the College’s operating budget has broken even, so the College is not “losing money” in that sense. However, other financial trends are concerning. The Market Value of our endowment has decreased over the past three years. This is concerning because not only is the spending rate as a percentage of endowment been the highest since 2009-2010, but also that the college is not being compensated from its spending by return on investment. In 2013-2014, the spending rate was 3.5 percent and the College received 17.8 percent return on investment. In 2015-2016, the spending rate rose to 4.0 percent but return on investment dropped 19 points, falling to -1.6 percent. The College is not only eating into its endowment to cover operating costs and projects, but is also losing money on its investments.  

Although class sizes are an important factor in determining academic quality, it’s not the only thing. Other things to consider for academic quality include advising, quality of professors, resources outside the classroom, and quality control techniques. However, some students on campus would say that Swarthmore College also fails to meet its own standards in those categories, but that discussion is for another time.

We at the Phoenix encourage the administration to fix this problem by adding more sections to larger classes, which will decrease the average number of students per section and limit the total number of students lotteried out of classes. To do this, the administration might want to consider analyzing the amount of funds given to each department to make sure departments with larger numbers of students receive more adequate funding.

Hopefully, the College can find a way to reverse its current track and begin providing students with the educational experience we were promised.

Mary Lyons Basement To Undergo Renovations

in Around Campus/News by

Next year, the college hopes to increase the incoming freshmen class size from this year’s 379 to approximately 391. As gradual expansion occurs, members of the administration are seeking to capitalize on any available dorm space that could provide extra housing.

As a result, the Mary Lyon Hall (ML) basement is being prepared to house students next year. Vice President for Facilities and Services Stu Hain said that work would be completed prior to the beginning of the fall semester.

“We are indeed making the garden level (basement) rooms in ML ready for use next fall,” he said. “They do not need a lot of work, as when we took them out of service, they were in good shape. We will paint them, put in new flooring material, replace lights and replace furniture where necessary.”

Additional lighting will be installed in each hallway and all rooms will be painted and patched. Plans for a new student lounge located next to the laundry room, equipped with a TV, cushioned seating, and bar stools are also in the works. Additionally, another resident assistant (RA) will be hired for the hall.

Current plans are to offer six different blocks in ML to anyone from the rising senior, junior, and sophomore classes.  Renovations and updates to ML’s lower level will continue through the spring and summer in preparation for opening the floor.

However, the basement, according to some, is in a questionable state for living quarters.

“I think the main problem is simply that no one has lived there for a while,” said Mercer Borris ’16, an ML resident. “It’s dusty and smells vaguely of mold, and the hallways are dark and eerie.”

She also mentioned that the rooms are filled with old mattresses, and a few of the ceilings have deteriorated over time.

But Borris said it was still inhabitable. “It isn’t terrible, though,” she explained. “I’’m sure that after a few months of being inhabited, the basement will seem like a decent living space.

She also mentioned that because Mary Lyons is built on a hill, the basement is only half underground. The space has numerous windows that allow for natural light to enter.

John Lim ’16, another ML resident, echoed Borris’ sentiments.

“It’s very old and kind of grungy,” said Lim. “But it mainly has the same feel of the rest of the building. There are cracked walls but its also pretty well lit. I only go down to do laundry, but it’s not too bad.”

Varying annual class size can create strain on administration, and only so much dorm space is available.  Dean Jim Bock, the head of admissions and financial aid, explained that there would always be enough space for the amount of students accepted, and that in terms of annual class size, the college essentially “looks to replace the exiting senior class.”

“Last year,”  he said, “There was less room, and we admitted a smaller class, and this year there will be more room, and we are looking to fill to capacity. The renovations in ML allow us to address both issues of current housing tightness and the slightly larger class.”

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